Articles Posted in Excessive Trading

Stoltmann Law Offices is investigating cases where brokers have traded excessively and churned their clients’ accounts. FINRA, the U.S. securities industry regulator,  reached a settlement with R.W. Baird for allegedly overcharging commissions on thousands of stock trades in 2019 and 2020. The firm will pay more than $416,000 in fines and restitution.

FINRA alleged “a substantial failure to supervise the commissions the firm was collecting, citing a minimum-commission policy of $100 per trade that resulted in inappropriately large fees for clients who made smaller transactions,” Barron’s reported. FINRA cited one case involving a Baird client who “purchased two shares of Apple stock for $772 and paid the $100 commission, amounting to 13% of the principal transaction.”

FINRA cited three rules that Baird allegedly violated in its trading activity, including FINRA Rule 2121, which sets terms for fair prices and commissions. That rule offers guidance that firms should cap commissions at 5%, but notes that percentage “is a guide, not a rule. FINRA urges brokers to think of the 5% threshold as a ceiling, not a floor, noting that other factors might render a commission at that level too high.”

Stoltmann Law Offices are investigating cases where brokers have sold clients single-stock, Exchange-Traded Funds (ETFs). Massachusetts Secretary of the Commonwealth William Galvin office has announced a probe of single stock ETF offerings, according to Investment News. Galvin’s office, Investment News reports, is “seeking to protect ‘Main Street investors’ from harm by initiating a sweep of complex single stock exchange traded fund offerings recently made public.”

“These are risky products, investing in only one stock, with no diversity cushion whatsoever,” Galvin said in a statement. “For nearly all Main Street investors, there is no difference between investing your money in single-stock ETFs and gambling with that money at a casino,” he added. “Under no circumstances should an investor use these products as a long-term investment.”

ETFs are typically broad-based baskets of stocks, bonds and other securities in one package. They are known for their tradability and relatively low costs. But some of these products can pose high risks to investors, who can lose money.

Chicago-based Stoltmann Law Offices represents investors who’ve suffered losses from dealing with broker-advisors who’ve placed clients in unsuitable investments.

FINRA, the federal securities regulator, has ordered JP Morgan to pay an investor $4 million for “unsuitable securities — including high-risk equities and junk bonds –without authorization,” according to Advisorhub.com. The JPM client also alleged a JP Morgan broker had “used leverage to increase the bets in her portfolio, including high-risk foreign currency positions.”

The broker on the accounts appears to be Edward L. Turley, Advisorhub reported. Morgan fired Turley, a “star” broker who reportedly generated as much as $30 million in revenue on $1.6 billion in assets, in August. He has $57 million in pending damage claims from four customer complaints on his record tied to losses sustained in last year’s pandemic-triggered market crash, excluding the award in the most recent case.

Chicago-based Stoltmann Law Offices is investigating financial advisors who switch clients into more expensive alternative investments that trigger unnecessary fees and investment losses.

FINRA, the federal securities industry regulator, has settled charges with McNally Financial Services Corporation that the broker-dealer failed “to develop appropriate oversight procedures for sales of non-traditional exchange traded products (ETFs).” The regulator found that the firm “failed to supervise a representative offering complex options trading to customers and determined that a firm representative recommended trades with, in some cases, a maximum potential loss nine times higher than maximum potential gain, and in other cases, with an assured loss.”

Brokers often recommend and trade “non-traditional” vehicles such as options contracts and Exchange-Traded Products (ETPs) with the promise of offering higher returns. These products, however, carry higher risk and generate exorbitant fees and commissions for brokers. These investments, Finra notes, “typically are not suitable for retail investors who plan to hold them for more than one trading session.”

Chicago-based Stoltmann Law Offices is investigating claims by investors in connection with financial advisors who switch clients into more expensive investments that trigger unnecessary fees. Overtrading in a brokerage account or “churning” has long been an industry abuse. But some brokers take churning to new limits.

FINRA, the US securities industry regulator, has suspended a former Edward Jones broker for six months and fined him $7,500 for allegedly making more than 800 transactions in four of his clients’ accounts without their authorization or consent, according to thinkadvisor.com.

From December 2017 to November 2018, Albert L. DeGaetano “executed 470 securities transactions in the accounts of a fundraising organization for a charitable hospital without its authorization or consent,” according to the FINRA letter. The 823 securities transactions in all, which included 389 purchases of exchange-traded fund (ETF) bonds, had a total principal value of about $7.2 million and generated approximately $113,000 in total trading costs, according to FINRA.

Chicago-based Stoltmann Law Offices is investigating financial advisors and brokers who trade excessively in client accounts.  “Churning,” or trading excessively to generate broker commissions, is one of the perennial abuses in the securities industry. Investors have been losing millions due to these practices.

FINRA, the U.S. securities industry regulator, said it has ordered New York City-based Aegis Capital Corp. to “pay approximately $2.8 million, including $1.7 million in restitution to 68 customers whose accounts were potentially excessively and unsuitably traded by the firm’s representatives.” FINRA also imposed a $1.1 million fine for Aegis’s supervisory violations, according to fa-mag.com.

“Aegis supervisors failed to detect or act on information that eight Aegis reps excessively and unsuitably traded customer accounts over a period of more than four years, generating $2.9 million in trading costs that would have required the investments to generate more than 71% returns to offset costs,” FINRA stated. FINRA found that “from July 2014 to December 2018, Aegis failed to implement a supervisory system reasonably designed to comply with FINRA’s suitability rule. As a result, Aegis failed to identify and address its representatives’ potentially excessive and unsuitable trading in customer accounts, including trading by eight Aegis representatives who excessively traded 31 customers’ accounts,” the regulator said.

Chicago-based Stoltmann Law Offices is investigating financial advisors who switch clients into more expensive investments that trigger unnecessary fees. Financial advisors and brokers who work on commission often make “exchanges” that switch clients from one investment into a very similar different investment. They often use the rationale that “you’ll make more money” in these new investments, but the truth is that they’ll make more in commissions and fees.

NY Life Securities has agreed to “pay a total of $263,347 to settle allegations that, as a result of supervisory failures, it failed to prevent several of its clients from being charged excessive, unnecessary fees after one of its brokers engaged in unsuitable mutual fund and cross-product switches,” according to FINRA, the federal securities regulator, as reported by ThinkAdvisor.com.

“On hundreds of occasions” between January 2015 and March 2019, a broker at the firm, identified only as “Broker A,” recommended that 10 clients buy and sell Class A mutual funds after holding the shares for short periods of time, according to FINRA

Chicago-based Stoltmann Law Offices has represented investors who’ve suffered losses from brokers who churn customer accounts. One of the most perennial abuses in the brokerage industry is when broker-adviser “churn” accounts to generate extra commissions or fees. When that happens, it’s difficult for clients to make money because their accounts are consumed by transaction fees.

Marc Augustus Reda, a registered representative for Spartan Capital Securities in New York City, was recently charged by FINRA, the securities industry regulator, with overcharging clients some $2 million. “From 2017 through 2019,” reports fa-mag.com, “Reda, among other things, recommended unsuitable investments to his clients and traded excessively in those accounts, the FINRA complaint said. His activities resulted in 66 clients paying a total of $952,764 in commissions and fees, while incurring total net losses of $934,482,” FINRA said.

Reda generated the excessive fees through an “active trading” strategy in which he made trades without his clients’ specific permission. FINRA noted that “Reda failed to consider that the substantial commissions and costs associated with his investment strategy made it unlikely his customers could make any profits.”

Chicago-based Stoltmann Law Offices has represented investors who’ve suffered losses from dealing with brokers who have failed to recognize their clients’ need for lower-risk portfolios. It’s no secret that the COVID pandemic has made the stock and bond markets more volatile. When the outbreak first hit markets, it triggered a massive sell-off in everything from blue chip stocks to municipal bonds.

Yet many broker-advisers failed to protect their clients, keeping them in high-risk portfolios that lost money. Even though they constantly make claims to the contrary, almost no advisor can time markets to fully protect investors. Few saw the pandemic coming, or the devastating impact it would have on the world economy.

After the stock market peaked on February 19, 2020, it dropped 34% in a month, hitting a bottom on March 23. But by June, the market had bounced back, surging 39%. Then, on Oct. 28, the Dow dropped more than 900 points as COVID cases again surged worldwide in a second, record-setting wave. Who could have predicted such stomach-churning volatility? Investors who were risk averse and needed to protect principal – and were overexposed to stocks – got burned the most.

Chicago-based Stoltmann Law Offices has been representing investors nationwide against unscrupulous brokerage firms and their financial advisors for more than fifteen years. Sometimes one of the best ways to avoid bad brokers is to do a little homework. Doing a simple background check can reveal a number of red flags that will help you steer clear of bad actors. All broker records are publicly accessible through the regulator FINRA’s website on a service called BrokerCheck.

What does BrokerCheck tell you? While it may not give you a complete background profile, it will show you if they have been disciplined or fined by FINRA, the US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) and other agencies. A pattern of multiple violations is a sure signal that you should avoid them. BrokerCheck will also give you an employment history and information on the firms that employed them. Although it’s not unusual for brokers to jump from one firm to another, repeated employment disruptions may be a warning sign as well.

As the prime securities brokerage regulator, FINRA can fine, sanction and bar brokers from the industry. Complaints about brokers must be investigated – and recorded – by FINRA. If brokers refuse to cooperate with the regulator, they can lose their securities licensing and be expelled from the business.

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