Articles Posted in FINRA Enforcement

FINRA permanently barred former Securities America financial advisor, Bobby Wayne Coburn (“Coburn”) on August 27, 2019 after he failed to appear at the disciplinary hearing. This came after Securities America terminated Mr. Coburn on March 20, 2019 for soliciting multiple clients to invest in an unapproved private securities transaction. He also tried to settle a complaint made by a customer without notifying the firm. According Mr. Coburn’s FINRA BrokerCheck report, the securities were in the form of promissory notes and real estate securities.

On notice of Coburn’s violations, FINRA promptly initiated an investigation into Coburn in July 2019. According to the Acceptance, Waiver, and Consent (“AWC”) FINRA entered against Coburn, Securities America learned in January 2019 that Coburn sold unregistered securities to clients in 2010 and 2011. Securities America also discovered the Coburn settled a customer complaint relating to this scheme in 2016 without providing the required notice to his firm and FINRA.  When FINRA requested documents and information from Coburn, he informed FINRA that he was no longer working in the securities industry and refused to produce the documents and information, in violation of FINRA Rule 8210. FINRA also found that Coburn violated Rule 2010, which is a “catch all” rule requiring that brokers and firms conduct business with “high standards of commercial honor” and maintain “just and equitable principles of trade”. FINRA permanently barred Coburn from the securities industries for violating these rules.

Coburn’s career in the financial services industry began in 1986 at Ameritas Investment Corp. During his thirty-three year career, he bounced from firm to firm, and landed at Securities America in January 2009. He worked from the Fort Meade, Florida branch office. Two customers have filed complaints against Coburn, including one complaint related to the real estate investment scheme. According to his BrokerCheck report, Coburn sold the client an investment in a Costa Rica real estate development, which did not make the required payments pursuant to the promissory note. The complaint for $32,000 was settled for $7,000. The entire settlement was paid by Coburn. Another client of Coburn and Securities America formally complained about an unsuitable variable annuity that Coburn sold, and the $5,000 complaint was settled for nearly $55,000, with Coburn contributing $5,000.

Crypto related currencies have been called a lot of things. The next big thing. A bright, shiny object.  When top financial regulators say they aren’t comfortable that they haven’t learned about the full dangers of crypto, you’re wise to be wary too. Investment promoters often try to convince hungry investors they can turn hot topics of the day from oil and gas fracking to self-driving cars into wealth.

But often the only wealth that surfaces from their drumbeat is an abundant pile of victims.  Crypto crooks stole over $4 billion from investors this year, the blockchain consulting firm CipherTrace warned in a new study.  Even the sophisticated are vulnerable and increasingly so.

“Exchanges and users are facing a greater sophistication in the tactics, techniques and procedures (TTPs) cybercriminals are using to target the cryptocurrency space. In the case of exchange robberies, hackers have developed advanced methods to overcome even the current “best practice” security in place at the more vigilant exchanges,” CipherTrace cautioned.

On August 5, 2019, FINRA fined Morgan Stanley registered representative Ken Kavanagh $25,000 and suspended him from practicing in the securities industry for eighteen after discovering that he concealed his outside business activity. According to FINRA’s order, beginning in 2003, Kavanagh provided personal management services to professional athletes. In October 2007, he registered his business as CEO-Sports in New Jersey, then formed another LLC in Pennsylvania, MGMT LLC. His services included coordinating travel and dinner arrangements, housing, bill payment, opening and managing bank accounts, and referrals to other professionals for tax return preparations and wills. Kavanagh had approximately 42 clients and generated at least $5 million in fees from 2012 through 2018 for providing these services.

FINRA Rule 3270 (formerly NASD Rule 3030) prohibits FINRA financial advisors from engaging in outside businesses unless they are properly disclosed to and approved by the advisor’s  brokerage firm. Mr. Kavanagh did not disclose his interest in MGMT or CEO-Sports to Morgan Stanley. He also attested in annual questionnaires required by Morgan Stanley that he was not involved with any outside business activities. He named a close relative as the sole owner or member of MGMT and CEO-Sports and also as the authorized representative on the each company’s bank accounts.  As a result of these FINRA Rule violations, FINRA fined Kavanagh $25,000 and suspended him for eighteen months.

As Stoltmann Law Offices previously alerted investors, Kavanagh has not been registered in the securities industry since resigning from Morgan Stanley in April 2018 after a client complained of his undisclosed outside business activities. On August 15, 2018, a customer also complained that Kavanagh placed unauthorized trades and forged documents.

In this digital era, where iris biometrics are flowering prints of digits are still being relied upon by brokerages and banks to catch crooks and to stop them from working at cashiers’ windows.  A few days ago, Citigroup Global Markets was fined $1.25 million in part for failing to screen over 500 employees through fingerprinting, a technology first employed in the United States in the first decade of the 20th century.

Three workers with criminal convictions fell through the cracks. While it does happen, finger pointing of financial firms for failure to do mandatory fingerprinting by regulators is rare.  Two years ago, FINRA fined J.P. Morgan the same amount for not fingerprinting 2,000 workers.

FINRA and state regulators require fingerprinting for broker-dealers. The SEC doesn’t mandate fingerprinting for investment advisers, but some states do for the smaller advisers who are under their oversight. All job applicants to the FDIC must submit fingerprints.

Why FINRA Enforcement is cracking down on “cockroach” brokers. The entire article can be viewed at the link below. The most recent case is that of 10 employees, including the president, of the now-defunct Global Arena Capital Corp out of New York City, left their former firm where they were accused of using misleading sales pitches, churning account and other violations. Before that, a group of seven brokers, who were being supervised, left HFP Capital Markets to join Global Arena. These cases are examples of “cockroaching,” a practice in which brokers stay in the securities industry by moving between risky or expelled firms while committing securities violations. See link below

https://www.investmentnews.com/article/20150915/FREE/150919947/finra-cracks-down-on-cockroach-brokers

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