Articles Posted in UBS

Chicago-based Stoltmann Law Offices is representing investors who’ve suffered losses from investing in options strategies that went wrong. Along those lines, an arbitration panel recently ordered UBS to pay more than $1.4 million to a husband and wife who accused the bank of misrepresenting a complex YES options trading strategy that tanked, according to barrons.com.

“Dozens of investors have filed arbitration claims against UBS for alleged misrepresentations in how the strategy was marketed and implemented. A customer has also filed a lawsuit against the company seeking class action status,” Barrons reported. UBS, which has previously denied the allegations, has won some arbitration cases, but lost others.

Approximately 1,500 customers participated in the YES strategy. Assets invested in YES accounts ballooned to $5.7 billion in December 2018, according to the lawsuit seeking class action status. The strategy suffered substantial losses totaling about $1.2 billion, according to the lawsuit.

Chicago-based Stoltmann Law Offices is representing clients who’ve suffered investment losses from advisors who sold fraudulent investments products and offerings. Firms like UBS argue these are frequently, “selling away” claims, suggesting they have no liability for the wrongs of their brokers who go far afield to rip off their clients. The big banks are wrong.

UBS Financial Services is suing Robert Turner, of McGregor, Texas, on fraud allegations and is asking a judge to seize Turner’s assets to help UBS offset the cost of repaying its customers for some $17 million in losses. Turner is a former broker with UBS.

The lawsuit alleges Turner solicited at least 23 UBS customers to buy “purported investments” issued by Fairfax Financial Corporation. UBS claims the products were not authorized by the broker and didn’t know Turner was selling them. Turner, 67, worked at UBS for 25 years before going to work for Stifel, Nicolaus & Co. in October 2021. He has since resigned from Stifel and has lost his license as a financial adviser.

Chicago-based Stoltmann Law Offices has represented investors who’ve suffered investment losses as a result of negligence, breach of fiduciary duty, and other violations by UBS Financial Services and its financial advisors.

Recently, FINRA, the U.S. securities industry regulator,  ordered UBS to pay more than $800,000 to two couples who had lost money in the company’s YES strategy, according to AdvisorHub.com.Investors Robert and Marcia Shinbrot recovered their full $269,337.09 loss plus prejudgment interest of $45,009.80 while Nicholas and Brigit Trentalange recovered their full $421,868.58 loss plus prejudgment interest of $70,499.93, according to the FINRA award.

Robert Shinbrot and Nicholas Trentalange were business partners in ForwardThink Group, a company acquired for $46 million by tech consulting firm Perficient in 2014. A separate FINRA panel awarded Houston investor Daniel Ferber the full $358,000 in damages he had sought, but denied his requests for interest and fees and costs.

Chicago-based Stoltmann Law Offices represents clients who’ve suffered losses as a result of unsuitable and speculative trading recommendations and strategies. If a broker recommends an awful securities trade – and you lose money – is the broker legally liable? Under rules that govern the conduct of securities brokers and financial advisors through FINRA, the prime U.S. securities regulator, if the trades they recommend are unsuitable, unauthorized, or a part of a larger scheme to defraud,  the answer is a resounding “yes”.

A UBS Financial Advisor who promoted to clients the idea of “short-selling” shares of Tesla (symbol TSLA) stock in 2019 and 2020, is accused of multiple violations in a FINRA complaint, according to AdvisorHub.com.

The broker, Andrew Burish, a 38-year industry veteran, recommended shorting Tesla stock, that is, making money on the stock price if it declines.  The problem is, during the relevant time period, Tesla stock price went through the roof  “triggering more than $23 million in losses for four couples—all members of an extended family—and another investor,” according to an arbitration claim filed with FINRA.

Chicago-based Stoltmann Law Offices in investigating cases where brokers have been treated unfairly by their firms.  A growing issue for financial advisors is when they are pushed out of their firms or treated unfairly simply for getting older. When this happens, brokers can file age discrimination lawsuits against their former employers.

Judith Bovitz, a 70-year-old financial advisor with Wells Fargo, sued her employer last year for age and gender discrimination. She claimed Wells retaliated against her by transferring her to a smaller branch office when she complained that younger, male advisors were being assigned more lucrative accounts, according to Reuters. She had a $100 million book of business at the time of the lawsuit. Bovitz spent her 34-year career at Wells and its Prudential Securities predecessor. “I’ve lost hundreds of thousands of dollars a year because other advisors were given accounts,” Bovitz told Advisorhub.com. “I’m sick and tired of being passed over.” The company said it is “reviewing” Bovitz’s allegations.

In 2011, Wells Fargo Advisors, the wealth management unit of Wells Fargo & Co. agreed to pay $32 million to settle a gender bias class-action suit with about 3,000 women advisors. The women claimed that compared with their male advisor counterparts, female advisors were “provided fewer business opportunities by the company. The women also claimed that female advisors were impaired by limited career advancement, work assignments and distribution of accounts,” one of the ways firms chose to shift customers to younger, male advisors.

Chicago-based Stoltmann Law Offices continues to represent investors who’ve suffered losses in connection with financial advisors who have oversold energy stocks and other energy-related investments. With the COVID-19 pandemic depressing demand for everything from gasoline to jet fuel, it’s been a mostly rotten year for energy stocks. In fact, when news first hit the markets in early March, stocks in many oil & gas companies and funds that invested in them crashed. At one time, the Energy Select SPDR (XLE), an exchange-traded fund that invests in energy companies, was down as much as 58%.

The net effect of tens of millions of Americans sheltering in place, avoiding travel and not commuting slashed demand for fuels. Only a handful of people were getting on jets, buses, ships, trains, or driving to work. That resulted in energy companies eliminating dividends and losing money.  While the economy has recovered somewhat as more states have re-opened in recent months, energy demand is nowhere near where it was at the beginning of 2020. The U.S. economy is now in a recession, which may continue into 2021.

What is important to realize about oil/gas prices is, the decline in energy demand actually began a few years ago – primary energy consumption dropped by half in 2019 alone — hasn’t stopped brokers from selling investments in oil & gas companies. They have sold stocks, limited partnerships, and mutual funds that concentrate in fossil fuels, which are volatile commodities and have a long history or volatility.

Chicago-based Stoltmann Law Offices continues to investigate investor claims related to UBS YES products.  In recent years, with savings yields at rock bottom, investors have been eager to attempt to safely earn a higher return on their money. Wall Street has responded with so-called “yield enhancement strategies” (YES) designed to pump up returns. But these strategies eek out this extra yield by employing extremely risky options trading strategies.

What brokers haven’t told investors in countless pitches, however, is that yield enhancement products are complicated and carry numerous hidden risks. The UBS YES program, involving an “iron condor” options trading plan, has attracted a great deal of attention recently. Investors are suing UBS, the Swiss wealth management firm, claiming they lost money when UBS brokers enrolled them in the strategy. Arbitration claims against the company have also been filed with FINRA, the securities industry regulator.

Investors who invested in the UBS YES program claim they suffered losses, even though the firm claimed the strategy was “conservative” and “low risk,” according to Wealthmanagement.com. What investors apparently were not told is how complex and convoluted the YES strategy was:

Chicago-based Stoltmann Law Offices has represented investors who’ve suffered losses from dealing with unscrupulous financial advisors selling municipal bonds and municipal bond funds

One of the most prominent trouble spots for investors have been mutual funds and single bonds issued by Puerto Rico, which was slammed by a long-standing debt crisis in recent years in addition to a devastating hurricane and breakdown of its infrastructure.  The island’s government, which issued the bonds, filed for bankruptcy, which triggered a negotiation with bondholders to negotiate its outstanding debt. That meant that bondholders will receive pennies on the dollar. A deal reached earlier this year slashed $8 billion in debts by 40%, according to Bloomberg News.

To date, the Puerto Rican collapse is the largest governmental bankruptcy in U.S. history, involving $129 billion in debts, reports The New York Times. The crisis was first noticed in 2012, when Moody’s downgraded the island’s bonds to near-junk status, which sunk prices of those debt securities. Since the bonds carried constitutional guarantees, investors were led to believe that they were secure. The bankruptcy was triggered since the island’s government was unable to pay back its debts. Investors, who were not fully informed of the fiscal debacle early on, got burned.

Stoltmann Law Offices has previously alerted consumers that their brokerage firms can be held responsible for theft in their brokerage, bank, or cryptocurrency accounts as a result of hacking. We have been successful in recovering these losses from brokerage firms for our clients. That is because the regulations are very clear on the supervision and compliance procedures that these firms must execute to protect their clients and their hard-earned savings.

FINRA Rule 3110 requires brokerage firms to establish and maintain a supervisory system to achieve compliance with applicable securities laws and regulations. Included in this supervisory system is the requirement to safeguard customer funds and securities and to inspect the “transmittals of funds (e.g., wires or checks, etc.) or securities from customers to third party accounts; from customer accounts to outside entities (e.g. banks, investment companies, etc.)…” (FINRA Rule 3110(c)(2)(A)).

Firms are further required to comply with the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act Safeguards Rule (Regulation S-P) and the Identity Theft Red Flags Rule (Regulation S-ID). Pursuant to Regulation S-ID, this includes having an Identity Theft Prevention Program with procedures to identify, detect, and respond to red flags of identity theft. 17 CFR §248.201(d).

Chicago-based Stoltmann Law Offices has represented investors who’ve suffered losses from risky municipal bonds. One of the most troubling investments for investors has been bond mutual funds and single municipal bonds issued by Caribbean territories like Puerto Rico. The island was devastated by Hurricane Maria and a debt crisis. The island’s government, which issued billions in municipal bonds, filed for bankruptcy, which forced bondholders to take losses. Like Puerto Rico, the neighboring Virgin Islands may be facing a debt meltdown of its own.

The U.S. Virgin Islands, also severely damaged by two hurricanes in recent years, is also dealing with an ongoing debt crisis. With only about 100,000 inhabitants spanning three Caribbean Islands, the U.S. protectorate had been issuing high-yield municipal bonds in recent years to fund essential government services such as a power utility. The government owes more than $6.5 billion to creditors, which averages some $19,000 per resident. In addition, the islands have billions in unfunded pension and healthcare obligations. That’s one of the highest per-capita debt loads in the Western Hemisphere.

The debt explosion in the Virgin Islands has gone from bad to worse. Three years ago, credit ratings agencies slashed the ratings on government bonds to junk status. While that made the bonds’ yields more attractive (they rose), it also indicated a higher risk of default. As a result, prices on those issues dropped.

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