Articles Tagged with Arbitration

Chicago-based Stoltmann Law Offices is representing clients who’ve suffered losses from advisors who sold clients cryptocurrencies that have lost value and investors who have lost funds due to identity theft, fraud, and hacking involving their crypto-currency accounts.  One of the biggest stories in finance, has been the epic crash of cryptocurrencies, which were pitched as profitable alternatives to cash, stocks, and bonds. “Cryptos” were sold as sure-fire hedges against inflation, but as inflation continued to rise, digital currencies kept heading south in a big way.

Worse yet, the overselling of cryptos has been tied to $1 billion losses in outright scams involving more than 46,000 people, according to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC). As with most swindles, investors were enticed with the promise of quick wealth with no risk. The “Crypto Crash” goes beyond the perils of high inflation and supply chain issues, though. Many observers believe the promise of crypto wealth is actually a Ponzi scheme that’s not linked to any underlying legitimate investment and is fueled by a stream of new investors being duped by the illusion of instant wealth.

The decline in some cryptos has been devastating. According to Robert Reich in The Guardian: “TerraUSD, a `stablecoin,” – a system that was supposed to perform a lot like a conventional bank account, but was backed only by a cryptocurrency called Luna – collapsed, losing 97% of its value in just 24 hours, apparently destroying some investors’ life savings.”

Chicago-based Stoltmann Law Offices represents investors who’ve suffered losses from dealing with brokerage firms who’ve placed clients in unsuitable investments and made recommendations mired in conflicts of interest. FINRA, the federal securities regulator, stated it has fined Credit Suisse Securities $9 million for failing to comply with securities laws and rules designed to protect investors, including the Securities and Exchange Commission’s (SEC) Customer Protection Rule and FINRA rules requiring firms to disclose potential conflicts of interest when issuing research reports.

Credit Suisse “failed to maintain possession or control of billions of dollars of fully paid and excess margin securities it carried for customers, as required. Second, on numerous occasions, the firm failed to accurately calculate its required customer reserve—that is, the amount of cash or securities the firm was required to maintain in a special reserve bank account,” FINRA found.

In addition, from 2006 through 2017, FINRA found “Credit Suisse issued more than 20,000 research reports that contained inaccurate disclosures about potential conflicts of interest. FINRA also found that the firm issued more than 6,000 research reports that omitted required disclosures. Credit Suisse’s disclosures omitted that the company that was the subject of the research report had been a client of the firm during the prior 12 months; or that the firm expected to receive investment banking compensation from the subject company within the next three months.”

Chicago-based Stoltmann Law Offices has represented investors who’ve suffered losses from broker-advisors who’ve sold their clients money-losing hedge fund investments. Often a broker’s pitch is almost entirely focused on high potential returns with little attention paid to the risk of losing money. Such was the case when brokers sold a hedge fund managed by Prophecy Asset Management. The investment firm was “supposed to spread out funds to dozens of separate money managers, but instead concentrated the money with a single Florida manager whose performance tanked when the pandemic threw markets into turmoil early last year,” according to Indianapolis Business Journal (IBJ).

Two funds managed by Prophecy ran aground last spring when news of the COVID pandemic roiled world markets. The two funds then suspended redemptions, which prevented investors from withdrawing their money. Brokers who sold Prophecy funds, led by a company called Indie Asset Partners, are now suing Prophecy.

The plaintiffs say in the suit that Prophecy CEO Jeffrey Spotts told them that “ostensibly due to the market volatility surrounding the coronavirus pandemic, the Trading Advisors Fund’s assets in their entirety—totaling approximately $363 million—have been placed at risk,” adds the IBJ. Spotts, who cofounded Prophecy Asset Management in 2001 after spending 12 years at Merrill Lynch, declined to comment to IBJ. Prophecy, which listed $561 million in assets under management in a February 2020 regulatory filing, shuttered its website recently.

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