Articles Tagged with Senior Financial Abuse

Chicago-based Stoltmann Law Offices is representing investors who’ve suffered losses from dealing with financial advisors who fleece older clients. In our practice, we’ve seen countless scams where older investors are lured into fraudulent investments. Unfortunately, investment and financial advisors frequently exploit and rip off elderly clients, who are often trusting yet vulnerable.

Common ruses involve “estate planning” seminars that come with a “free” lunch or dinner. Afterwards, brokers are known to peddle scam investments to those who show up. Lately though, investors are aggressively pitched through emails, texts and phone calls. These swindles mushroomed during the pandemic. According to the FBI, the number of scams targeting Americans over the age of 60 exploded during the pandemic, with upwards of 92,000 victims in 2021 alone involving estimated losses of nearly $2 billion, a 74% increase from 2020.

In the typical phone scam, fraudsters call older Americans, who are most likely to pick up the phone and listen to a pitch – and send money. Even former FBI and CIA director William Webster was targeted in a Jamaican lottery scam in 2014 when a caller claimed he won a sweepstakes, reports CBS News. The unsolicited caller became threatening when Webster declined to pay $50,000 to collect the winnings.  “If it can happen to me, it can happen to you,” Webster warned in a public service announcement.

Chicago-based Stoltmann Law Offices has represented scores of senior investors who’ve suffered losses from dealing with brokers who’ve sold them inappropriate investments. It’s a story we’ve seen all too often: A senior investor is “befriended” by a broker, who then sells them investments that are extremely risky and lose money. Before they know it, their nest egg is scrambled.

Regulators and consumer watchdogs have been trying to protect seniors for decades from rapacious brokers, advisors and insurance agents. The industry police are outnumbered by hundreds of thousands of salespeople selling anything from junk variable annuities to exchange-traded products that generate high commissions for the brokers while fleecing investors’ investment accounts.

Under a relatively new rule from FINRA, the securities industry regulator, older investors may garner somewhat more protection from unscrupulous advisors and brokers. It will provide a safeguard against broker-advisors from gaining entrees into their financial affairs through various vehicles. “FINRA Rule 3241 limits the ability of a broker-dealer to be named as a beneficiary, executor, trustee, or power of attorney for one of their customers,” according to The National Law Review. “Broker-dealers must provide written notice to their firm, and the firm must assess the situation and determine whether to approve or disapprove of the fiduciary relationship.”

CNBC
FOX Business
The Wall Street Journal
Bloomberg
CBS
FOX News Channel
USA Today
abc NEWS
DATELINE
npr
Contact Information