Articles Tagged with suitability

Chicago-based Stoltmann Law Offices has represented investors who’ve suffered losses from dealing with broker-advisors affiliated with the Cetera financial group.  The securities regulator FINRA recently fined three Cetera Financial Group broker-dealers $1 million, claiming that Cetera’s “supervisory systems and procedures were deficient when handling securities transactions.”

Like many advisory firms, Cetera employs representatives who are “dually registered,” meaning they are broker-dealers and registered investment advisers. In the Cetera case, their representatives managed more than $80 billion in assets across 47,000 accounts. According to U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) exams conducted in 2013, 2015 and 2017, Cetera was “aware of the supervisory deficiencies.”

Without admitting or denying the allegations, Cetera recently signed a FINRA letter of Acceptance, Waiver, and Consent and agreed to FINRA’s sanctions, which included a censure and an agreement that they would review and revise, as necessary, systems, policies and procedures related to the supervision of dually-registered reps’ securities transactions, according to ThinkAdvisor.com.

Stoltmann Law Offices, P.C. has represented investors in arbitration claims against brokerage firms involving non-traded REITs hundreds of times. We understand these products better than the brokers who sell them, which is what makes us effective advocates for our clients. If you invested your hard-earned money in the NorthStar Healthcare REIT and would like to discuss your options to recover your investment losses, please contact Stoltmann Law Offices at 312-332-4200.

On December 23, 2020, it was reported that the NorthStar Healthcare REIT was reducing its share price from $6.25 to $3.89. The facts on the ground for this non-traded REIT do not portend well for investors. According to published reports, the REIT retained a valuation expert to determine how the REIT can get out of the debt it is buried in. Unfortunately, the value of the REITs portfolio is only $1.6 billion but cost $2.2 billion.

Non-Traded REITs are the darlings of brokers and financial advisors. They are perfect investments from their perspective. They offer huge selling commissions, are not “volatile” because they do not trade on the open market, and offer a high income rate. Brokers do not need to “manage”  a position in a non-traded REIT like they do a well-managed portfolio. Even though they get paid 7X more for selling a non-traded REIT than they do for managing an account, (1% fee versus 7% commission), brokers love non-Traded REITs because they get to sell it and forget it.  The investor is left holding the bag when the REIT stops paying distributions, freezes redemptions, and cuts the share price by 70%. Then once the investor looks a little closer, you come to realize that “dividend” you’ve been paid all of these years was actually, mostly, just a return of your money – the REIT takes your money, shells out at least 10% for commissions and fees, puts the rest of it into its real estate portfolio, then shells out distributions that are mostly your own money given back to you.

Stoltmann Law Offices, P.C. is a Chicago-based investor rights law firm that offers representation nationwide on a contingency fee basis. We represent investors that lose money in bad investment products like Watermark Lodging Trust REIT in cases against brokerage firms and investment advisers. If you or someone you know has suffered investment losses in Carey Watermark n/k/a Watermark Lodging Trust REIT, please contact Stoltmann Law Offices for a no-obligation, free initial consultation.

In late November, Watermark Lodging Trust REIT reported its “NAV” or “Net-Asset-Value” as $5.51 per Class A share and $5.45 per Class T share. When this REIT was sold to investors, the NAV was $10 per share. Investors are looking at a loss on their December statement of nearly 50% of their principal investment. The Watermark Lodging Trust REIT was previously known as the Carey Watermark Investor and Carey Watermark Investors 1 REITs, which merged in April 2020.

If investors try to sell their shares on the secondary market, the bids are as low as $3 per share. Watermark Lodging REIT concentrates its real estate portfolio in hotels/hospitality which has been devastated this year by the COVID-19 pandemic. Although it is easy to blame the pandemic for these losses, an excuse brokers will certainly rely on, the fact is, this REIT has always been a high risk, speculative investment that concentrated investor money in a few properties in one narrow sector of the real estate world; hotels.  Non-Traded REITs are sold, not bought, by investors because financial advisors and brokers receive massive sales commissions for selling them.  These are “alternative” investments that offer higher income rates on paper, but in reality, usually distributed your own money back to you as a “distribution” and rarely generate enough income from the underlying portfolio to sustain their distribution rates. Most non-traded REITs are heavily indebted so that they can use debt to pay distributions to keep the flow of investor money coming in.

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